Vaccine Info

Twinrix Hepatitis Vaccine

Authored by
Staff
Last reviewed
August 1, 2021
Fact checked by
Robert Carlson, MD
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Twinrix Hepatitis Vaccine Description

GSK's Twinrix is a bivalent vaccine containing the antigenic components used in producing HAVRIX (strain HM175) and ENGERIX-B [noninfectious hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg)]. Twinrix works by causing the body to produce its own protection (antibodies) against these diseases.

TWINRIX is a vaccine used in adults, adolescents, children, and infants to prevent hepatitis A and B diseases. Additional doses may be required. Vaccination may not be suitable for everyone, so ask your healthcare professional if TWINRIX is right for you.

TWINRIX [Hepatitis A & Hepatitis B (Recombinant) Vaccine] Suspension for Intramuscular Injection initial U.S. FDA Approval was in 2001.

Trademarks are owned by or licensed to the GSK group of companies.

Twinrix Hepatitis Vaccine Indication

Twinrix is indicated for active immunization against disease caused by hepatitis A virus and infection by all known subtypes of hepatitis B virus. Hepatitis A and B are two serious liver diseases caused by the hepatitis A and B viruses. Both viruses are endemic (constantly present) in much of the developing world. Therefore, many popular travel destinations such as the Caribbean are considered risk areas for unprotected travelers.

TWINRIX is a vaccine used in adults, adolescents, children, and infants to prevent hepatitis A and B diseases. However, 100% protection cannot be guaranteed, and additional doses may be required.

Twinrix Hepatitis Vaccine Dosage

Twinrix is administered as an intramuscular injection. It is administered in a 3 dose series, at 0, 1, and 6 months.

Twinrix Hepatitis Vaccine Side Effects

Very common adverse events (>10% of doses) reported in adults were pain or discomfort, redness at the injection site, headache, and tiredness. Common adverse events (1% to 10% of doses) were swelling at the injection site, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, and generally feeling unwell. Very common adverse events (>10% of doses) reported in children were pain and redness at the injection site. Common adverse events (1% to 10% of doses) were swelling at the injection site, fever (more than 37.5°C), irritability, drowsiness, headache, loss of appetite, diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting generally feeling unwell. Allergic reactions may also occur.

Twinrix Hepatitis Vaccine News

July 28, 2021 - Emma Walmsley, Chief Executive Officer, GSK, said: “GSK delivered an excellent performance in Q2. We expect this positive momentum to continue through the second half of the year, driving us towards the better end of our earnings guidance range for 2021 and meaningful performance improvement in 2022. We continue to strengthen our pipeline and are advancing well towards separation. Our clear priority is to focus on execution, unlocking the value of Consumer Healthcare and delivering the step-change in growth and performance we now see for GSK.”

October 26, 2020 - Who Really Needs the Hepatitis B Vaccine? People with diabetes have twice the odds of becoming infected with this liver disease, by Michelle Crouch, AARP.

June 21, 2020 - The US state of Maine has seen an increase in hepatitis A cases in Penobscot, Somerset, and York counties over the past  4-months, the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention reported.

 

Clinical Trials

No clinical trials found