Vaccine Info

PittCoVacc SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine

PittCoVacc SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine Description

PittCoVacc SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine uses lab-made pieces of viral protein to build immunity. It’s the same way the current flu shots work. When tested in mice, the vaccine, delivered through a fingertip-sized patch, produces antibodies specific to SARS-CoV-2 at quantities thought to be sufficient for neutralizing the virus. 

These researchers were able to react quickly to this new coronavirus since they had already laid the groundwork during earlier coronavirus epidemics.

“We had previous experience on SARS-CoV in 2003 and MERS-CoV in 2014. These two viruses, which are closely related to SARS-CoV-2, teach us that a particular protein, called a spike protein, is important for inducing immunity against the virus. We knew exactly where to fight this new virus,” said co-senior author Andrea Gambotto, M.D., associate professor of surgery at the Pitt School of Medicine.

PittCoVacc SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine Indication

PittCoVacc SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine candidate is indicated to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection.

PittCoVacc SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine Dosage

PittCoVacc SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine will use a novel approach for delivery called a microneedle array, to increase potency.

This array is a fingertip-sized patch of 400 tiny needles that deliver the spike protein pieces into the skin, where the immune reaction is strongest. The patch goes on like a Band-Aid and then the needles — which are made entirely of sugar and the protein pieces — simply dissolve into the skin.

The vaccine candidate can sit at room temperature until it’s needed, eliminating the need for refrigeration during transport or storage.

PittCoVacc SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine Clinical Trial

Pending FDA approval for an investigational new drug.

PittCoVacc SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine News

April 3, 2020 – A coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine candidate has shown promise in early testing, according to a paper published by investigators from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

April 2, 2020 -  University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine scientists today announced a potential vaccine against SARS-CoV-2, the new coronavirus causing the COVID-19 pandemic. When tested in mice, the vaccine, delivered through a fingertip-sized patch, produces antibodies specific to SARS-CoV-2 at quantities thought to be sufficient for neutralizing the virus. 

 

Updated
05/21/2020 - 08:43